Blog

3 Simple Steps to bring calm into your classroom

 

Behaviour Management

 

Behaviour in class - 3 Simple Steps to Bring Calm into your Classroom

Running a classroom is like baking a cake. The process of managing behaviour in class successfully has many components which require careful consideration and the correct proportions. You make a lesson plan, add all of the learning ingredients and hope the results are a success. But I know the outcome isn’t always rainbows and butterflies, the ability to strive and constantly stay on top doesn’t always prevail, leaving you hungry for the calm which you deserve.

So let’s break this down and provide you with 3 simple steps to get the behaviour of your students on track again!

  1. Source the problem - Whether you’re teaching maths or business, every student needs to be involved. If you’ve never received any feedback from your learners, go out...

Punishment isn’t an effective tool

I regularly work with teachers and support staff around their use of positive language in behaviour management.

It’s human nature to berate, scold, or become exasperated when behaviour stops learning or when a seemingly innocuous event ends up on the disciplinary path.

Punishment isn’t the only tool in your classroom management toolbox. Calling for assistance, threatening with disciplinary action or pursuing an argument to the bitter end sets out a message that you are not in control. In fact, I’d go as far as to say that these must be the last resort rather than the first one, because many behaviours can be managed very well using simple verbal cues.

It’s what we could term high emotional intelligence. "Emotional intelligence is the ability to identify and manage your own emotions and the emotions of others." This usually involves: ... the ability to manage your...

Some things are really troubling me

 

Here's a transcript of the video (if you aren't able to watch/listen)

Some things are really troubling me, because of a couple of articles I’ve read recently.  It started with some data regarding the number of teachers leaving the profession, and recently an article in TES which said that a teacher had written in to say that as she “slumped on her computer she realised she couldn’t go on any more”.

That strikes a chord with me.  I’m a teacher and I know how difficult it is, the way I developed my teaching career was a long slow burn but I loved every minute of it.  The last several years were very full on.

What I know is that when I decided to leave and follow my path, I didn’t leave the education sector, I stayed with what I knew, the system that I love so much, and found a way to...

Are you a dissatisfied teacher? You’re not alone

Almost every day I read or hear of upset, stress and unhappiness amongst teachers and support staff.  They work in EVERY part of the education sector, so it isn't a reflection on any particular age group of learners.

It saddens me to know that these hard-working educators are stifling their creativity and (probably) not reaching the high levels of enjoyment in their career which they deserve.

Over the weekend I read an article in the TES  and which was uploaded to Facebook with many comments.  If that doesn't resonate with you, nothing will.

Last year, after discussion with a number of people who wanted to explore what life would be like post-teaching, many explained to me that they would like to know more about replicating my own training business.  In other words, become an independent freelance trainer.

So I ran a quick challenge over 8 days - "Concept to Course" - which was designed to focus the mind to see which courses...

An ADHD agony – fidgeting in class

Luke was feeling fidgety. He knew there were 2 more hours to get through, and it was hot in class and because of his ADHD he was already wriggling and squirming.  His leg had started jiggling and the rhythm was pleasing to his active brain, calming it a little bit.

He tried to retain some control, but he just couldn’t stop himself from twiddling with his lanyard. Flip, flip, twizzle it went.  Over and over again.  “Ahh, that’s better” he thought.

But his teacher saw this and told him to stop, which he did.

15 long minutes later the lanyard was out again. This time, it was snatched out of his hand and he was left wondering what his Plan B would be.

At this moment, Luke started to slip away mentally from this class.


Research has shown that people who display signs of ADHD can concentrate better when they’re allowed to fidget.

SIGN UP FOR
YOUR FREE GUIDE
member-banner
Justt contact us on 07763942771 to let us know what you need.