Luke was feeling fidgety. He knew there were 2 more hours to get through, and it was hot in class and he was already wriggling and squirming.  His leg had started jiggling and the rhythm was pleasing to his active brain, calming it a little bit.

He tried to retain some control, but he just couldn’t stop himself from twiddling with his lanyard. Flip, flip, twizzle it went.  Over and over again.  “Ahh, that’s better” he thought.

But his teacher saw this and told him to stop, which he did.

15 long minutes later the lanyard was out again. This time, it was snatched out of his hand and he was left wondering what his Plan B would be.

At this moment, Luke started to slip away mentally from this class.


Research has shown that people who display signs of ADHD can concentrate better when they’re allowed to fidget.

Did you Know

 

So provide an acceptable fidget opportunity – doodling, folding, physical learning activities, structured seat breaks – and you’ll be making reasonable adjustment for Luke and others like him.